I think I may be ill.

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The other night, my husband and I were relaxing and watching a little television.  A commercial break came and there was a healthy looking man walking in a corn field with a sweet little girl.  Admittedly I wasn’t paying a whole lot of attention until it reached the end and said that “sugar is sugar” and splashed a cornsugar.com logo on my screen.  Mouth agape, I looked at my husband and he looked at me.

Corn sugar?  Really?

According to Corn.org
“CORN REFINERS PETITION FDA FOR USE OF “CORN SUGAR” AS ALTERNATE NAME FOR HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

ELIMINATING CONSUMER CONFUSION IS THE GOAL”

As my husband said, why not “corn vitamins” or something else as ridiculous.  Uh, yea.  I think we, the consumer, understand just fine.  They say they want to “eliminate consumer confusion”;  I think they want to rid themselves of the negative connotation that comes with HFCS and to create confusion so that people unaware of a change and trying to avoid HFCS will purchase products containing it.

In case anyone would like a refresher course in all things HFCS, read this.

So what do you think about this news?  Do you think the FDA will see through the corn refiners’ petition and stand up for the consumer?  I’d love to hear your take on this.

Amanda Hearn
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22 Comments

  • I saw that add, too! Ugh. And the whole argument about "sugar is sugar" doesn't cover some of the other concerns about HFCS.

    For example, WHY is corn syrup in so many products? Particularly products, that either need no sweetener, or that another sweetener, such as honey, would cover equally as well, or better?

  • I'm pretty sure the answer to those questions is that 1) Americans are addicted to sweets, and HFCS is the ultimate sweet (blech!) & 2) HFCS is cheaper than sugar or honey! Cheaper = bigger profit margins.

  • I'm pretty sure the answer to those questions is that 1) Americans are addicted to sweets, and HFCS is the ultimate sweet (blech!) & 2) HFCS is cheaper than sugar or honey! Cheaper = bigger profit margins.

  • I saw that commercial too and was immediately disgusted….2 years ago I would have fallen for it…and I wonder how many unsuspecting people will.

  • Gosh, I so love your blog, just found it, and am now following! I can't wait to learn more from you. Please, please, pretty please, stop by my blog today. Every Friday I have a blog hop focused on all things Fresh Clean and Pure in our lives (however, no giveaway posts or coupons) – – it's purely to share posts on how we're cleaning up our lives and our world. I truly believe that you have tons to add! Thanks!

  • Gosh, I so love your blog, just found it, and am now following! I can't wait to learn more from you. Please, please, pretty please, stop by my blog today. Every Friday I have a blog hop focused on all things Fresh Clean and Pure in our lives (however, no giveaway posts or coupons) – – it's purely to share posts on how we're cleaning up our lives and our world. I truly believe that you have tons to add! Thanks!

  • I had the same reaction…but, then, is it really all that differnt from those commercials they've been running saying that it is "not any different than regular sugar"? They will find a way to mislead consumers because they have such a HUGE market. It is basically up to us to read labels and choose NOT to buy things with HFCS or "corn sugar."

  • Actually sugar is sugar, credible research has shown that HFCS is metabolized very similiarly to sugar. Its likely too many calories with resulting weight gain that causes diabetes and other diseases, not HFCS alone, like another stated its not poison. Your blog just sites other blogs without much back up of evidence. Doing a medline search will pull up "Credible" evidence on HFCS that mainly show its not responsible for obesity etc but that it should be used in moderation just like sugar and other things

  • I agree that sugar is sugar. I disagree that HFCS is "sugar". A sugar perhaps, but not the same as table sugar or other natural sweeteners. Chemically similar does not make it the same thing. There are many molecular combinations that if altered slightly become vastly different – if I'm recalling my Chemistry courses correctly.

    HFCS is chemically modified. I clearly prefer and believe in all things in their natural form, thus the reason for the blog.

    As I've stated time and time again, I don't believe that HFCS in nearly all of the products on store shelves moderation. When we decided to eliminate it from our diets we had to vastly change our shopping habits, and we thought we ate healthy before.

    I don't believe it's poison and run screaming, but I do my best to eliminate it because of moderation. I also don't sit and eat spoonfuls of table sugar.

    Here is a link to the Princeton study on HFCS for some credible evidence
    http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/index.xml?section=topstories

  • I agree that sugar is sugar. I disagree that HFCS is “sugar”. A sugar perhaps, but not the same as table sugar or other natural sweeteners. Chemically similar does not make it the same thing. There are many molecular combinations that if altered slightly become vastly different – if I'm recalling my Chemistry courses correctly.

    HFCS is chemically modified. I clearly prefer and believe in all things in their natural form, thus the reason for the blog.

    As I've stated time and time again, I don't believe that HFCS in nearly all of the products on store shelves moderation. When we decided to eliminate it from our diets we had to vastly change our shopping habits, and we thought we ate healthy before.

    I don't believe it's poison and run screaming, but I do my best to eliminate it because of moderation. I also don't sit and eat spoonfuls of table sugar.

    Here is a link to the Princeton study on HFCS for some credible evidence
    http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/index.xml?section=topstories

  • Have you seen Food Inc and Food Matters? Corn crops are one of the most cheap and highly genetically modified, so it's in the government's best interest (as far as the bottom line, not their people) to promote its consumption.

Comments are closed.